Grandmother Ordered to Delete Facebook Photos


By Isobel Asher Hamilton & Sophia Ankel, Business Insider


Europe’s famously robust privacy laws have been used to make a grandmother take down pictures of her grandchildren from the internet.

A court in Holland ruled earlier this month that a grandmother must take down all of the pictures of her grandchildren she posted on Facebook and Pinterest after her daughter and mother of the children filed a complaint under General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)…more

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