Helping Children Cope After a Traumatic Event


By Child Mind Institute


In the wake of a traumatic event, your comfort, support, and reassurance can make children feel safe, help them manage their fears, guide them through their grief, and help them recover in a healthy way.

This guide was assembled by psychiatrists, psychologists, and mental health experts who specialize in crisis situations. It offers simple tips on what to expect, what to do, and what to look out for. If you or your children require assistance from a mental health professional, do not hesitate to ask a doctor or other health care provider for a recommendation….more

Read More

Previous: Case Dismissed Against Mom Who Let Her Toddler Pee in Parking Lot
Next: Uber Says ‘No’ to Kids, but a Growing Number of Ride Apps Say ‘Yes.’ Parents are a ‘Maybe’


DullesMoms.com is not the author of this content. All authors and sources are cited with links back to the original source. We’re sharing because we think it’s important, relevant, and share-worthy to moms, dads, and families!


Related Articles

Most New Fathers Experience “Dad Shaming”

Although “mom shaming” has been openly discussed in public forums in recent years, until now, “dad shaming” has stayed under the radar…

Mom-Shaming Ourselves — to Compare is Human, Even During a Pandemic

…That’s not the only time social media has made me feel both insecure and ashamed of the ways in which I am doing quarantine…

Why is My Big Kid Acting Like a Toddler?

Regressions are normal during stressful events. Here’s how to identify and deal with them…

Children Who Don’t Listen to Their Parents Make Higher Salaries, Study Says

Particularly stubborn kids frequently grow into particularly successful adults…

Parents Fear for Their Children’s Mental Health Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

…parents are questioning whether isolation measures and physical distancing are doing lasting damage to their kids…

What Kind of Parent Are You: Carpenter or Gardener?

The “carpenter” parent thinks that a child can be molded, writes Alison Gopnik. The “gardener,” on the other hand, is less concerned about who the child will become and…