Instagram, Facebook, and the Perils of “Sharenting”


By Hua Hsu, The New Yorker


For the vast majority of people, checking Instagram involves a mix of aspirationalism and voyeurism; the app feeds on a collective fear that we are missing out on something, whether it’s a fabulous party, a pop-up sale, or the mere concept of vacation. But the same dynamic doesn’t quite apply to parents sharing pictures of their young children online.

There certainly may be an element of proud boasting: “Oh, this? It’s just my daughter’s tastefully mismatched outfit,” “Admire my toddler son’s taste in jazz,” etc. But these carefully chosen glimpses of adorable bliss often do little more than mark a tranquil reprieve during an otherwise arduous day.

The isolation of parenthood delivers one to strange places, especially in the early going, and you need your tribe. Sharing images or stories on social media makes the experience bearable, connecting one to a larger world at a time when the scales and contours of life feel as though they are shrinking.

All of this seems harmless enough—annoying, even, if you have hit your saturation point of doughy newborns. Sometimes we annoy ourselves…more

Read More

Previous: Uber Says ‘No’ to Kids, but a Growing Number of Ride Apps Say ‘Yes.’ Parents Are a ‘Maybe’
Next: What a Kid Really Means When They Ask, ‘Why?’


DullesMoms.com is not the author of this content. All authors and sources are cited with links back to the original source. We’re sharing because we think it’s important, relevant, and share-worthy to moms, dads, and families!


Related Articles

Child Drownings Linked to Phone-Distracted Parents Who Fail to Look Up

The world’s largest lifeguard organization claims there’s a direct link between child drownings and the smartphones parents hold in their hands…

Anxiety & Coping With the Coronavirus

We’re all on edge because of the coronavirus. Our daily lives have been disrupted, we aren’t sure what tomorrow may bring…

Should Poor Parenting Cost?

Are we reaching the point where we should consider holding adult caregivers responsible for the actions of their offspring…

Abusive Parenting Styles Can Be Inherited. Here Are 5 Ways to Break the Cycle.

We don’t really talk much about corporal punishment, but it wasn’t so long ago that it was an acceptable way to discipline children…

In a Children’s Theater Program, Drama Over a Peanut Allergy

The conflict over accommodating a child’s allergy turned into a legal battle that highlights the isolation that people with food allergies often face…

What Kind of Parent Are You: Carpenter or Gardener?

The “carpenter” parent thinks that a child can be molded, writes Alison Gopnik. The “gardener,” on the other hand, is less concerned about who the child will become and…